Courses

Fall 2019

GS/PHIL 5460 3.0M Philosophical Logic

GS/PHIL 5460 3.0M Philosophical Logic
(Integrated with AP/PHIL 4460 3.0)

  • Day & Time: Thursdays 2:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: HNE 230
  • Course Director: Professor Judy Pelham
    E-mail: pelham@yorku.ca
    Office: S440 Ross

This course provides students with the background in logic necessary to do graduate work in many areas of analytic philosophy. This course presupposes students have successfully completed an introductory course in sentential and predicate logic.

GS/PHIL 5802 3.0M Core Practical I

GS/PHIL 5802 3.0M Core Practical I

  • Day & Time: Fridays 11:30am-2:30pm
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    E-mail: rarini@yorku.ca
    Office: S416 Ross
  • Course Director: Professor Robert Myers
    E-mail: rmyers@yorku.ca
    Office: S431 Ross

This course offers an advanced survey of some central themes in contemporary practical philosophy. It is designed to ensure that students have sufficient background to pursue graduate-level research in these areas, and required of MA students

GS/PHIL 5803 3.0M Core Practical II

GS/PHIL 5803 3.0M Core Practical II

  • Day & Time: Fridays 3:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    E-mail: rarini@yorku.ca
    Office: S416 Ross
  • Course Director: Professor Robert Myers
    E-mail: rmyers@yorku.ca
    Office: S431 Ross

This course provides a forum for further discussion of the central themes in contemporary practical philosophy. It is designed to prepare students to write the MA comprehensive examination in practical philosophy.

GS/PHIL 6180 3.0A Pragmatism

GS/PHIL 6180 3.0A Pragmatism

  • Day & Time: Thursdays 2:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Henry Jackman
    E-mail: hjackman@yorku.ca
    Office: S434 Ross

This seminar will look in to a number of question relating to pragmatism and truth. Among these will be (1) whether pragmatism’s tying truth to our ‘epistemic’ practices inevitably strips truth of the ‘objectivity’ we typically take it to have, (2) whether there are some areas of discourse, such as ethics, that are particularly well (or poorly) suited for pragmatic accounts, and (3) and whether so-called pragmatism about truth is better understood as pragmatism about meaning combined with some kind of minimalism about truth. The seminar will focus primarily on the contrast between the classical pragmatists William James and Charles Sanders Peirce, though the work of more contemporary neo-pragmatists like Richard Rorty and Huw Price will be considered as well.

GS/HUMA 6239 3.0A Understanding Exegesis in Select Philosophical Texts (Rene Descartes and David Hume)

GS/HUMA 6239 3.0A Understanding Exegesis in Select Philosophical Texts (Rene Descartes and David Hume) *

  • Day & Time: Tuesdays 8:30am–11:30am
    Room: RS 501
  • Course Director: Professor Stanley Tweyman
    E-mail: stweyman@yorku.ca
    Office: Vanier College 233

*cross-listed to GS/PHIL 6666 3.0A of the same title
Please check the RO registration site for Cat #’s for the respective departments

GS/PHIL 6370 3.0A Philosophy of Cognitive Science

GS/PHIL 6370 3.0A Philosophy of Cognitive Science

  • Day & Time: Tuesdays 1:00pm-4:00pm
    Room: RS 414F
  • Course Director: Professor Kevin Lande
    E-mail: kevinlande@gmail.com
    Office: TBA

Pieces of Mind
The state you are in when you see a yellow frisbee has at least two parts: a state of seeing the frisbee's yellowness and a state of seeing the frisbee's circularity. The state you are in when you have the thought that dumplings are delicious has at least two parts: a state that represents dumplings and a state that represents being delicious. Descriptions like these of the part-whole structures of mental states are central to how contemporary cognitive science makes sense of our mental lives. But what does it even mean to say that one mental state is a "part" of another? Do mental states really have other mental states as parts? And, if so, how are mental states actually structured? Are there similar kinds of structure in perception, thought, and even language? In addressing these questions we will discuss foundational issues concerning the nature of mental representation, computationalism about the mind, syntax and semantics, and the Language of Thought hypothesis. We will focus especially on visual perception, with an eye toward connecting philosophical questions to empirical work in psychology, neuroscience, and computer vision.

GS/PHIL 6400 3.0A Major Figures In Moral Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6400 3.0A Major Figures In Moral Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Mondays 1:00-4:00pm
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Alice MacLachlan
    E-mail: amacla@yorku.ca
    Office: S428 RossA

Course Description:
This course will examine two central figures and texts from the 18th century movement in moral theory known as Sentimentalism: A Treatise on Human Nature by David Hume, and Theory of Moral Sentiments by Adam Smith. We will read significant sections from both, supplemented by contemporary philosophical analysis of Smith and Hume – as well as more recent developments in contemporary sentimentalist moral theory. Our exploration of these works will include a detailed study of the nature of and foundational role for sympathy, as each philosopher sees it, as well as discussion of the moral functions of emotions and the social dimensions of moral practice.

Required Texts:
David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals. Ed. J.B. Schneewind, Hackett, 1983.
David Hume, A Treatise on Human Nature. Eds. Norton and Norton, Oxford University Press (Part of Oxford Philosophical Texts series) 2000.
Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments. Eds. D. D. Raphael and A. L. Macfie, Liberty Fund (Glasgow Edition) 1984.

Other readings will be made available on the course Dropbox.

Course Requirements:

Weekly Discussion Questions/Participation: 25%
Seminar Presentation: 25%
Final Paper Thesis/Outline: 10%
Final Paper 40%

GS/PHIL 6800 3.0A First-Year Seminar/ Seminar in Natural Normativity

GS/PHIL 6800 3.0A First-Year Seminar/ Seminar in Natural Normativity

  • Day & Time: Fridays 11:30am-2:30pm
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Kristin Andrews
    E-mail: andrewsk@yorku.ca
    Office: S420 Ross
  • Course Director: Professor Michael G Giudice
    E-mail: giudice@yorku.ca
    Office: S423 Ross

Law is widely taken to be a social construction. Morality is widely taken to be a natural phenomenon. In this seminar we will challenge both these ideas, reading philosophical work in legal theory, ethics, moral psychology, social norms, as well as empirical work in developmental psychology and animal cognition, and interdisciplinary work in cultural evolution and social norms. We will explore the possibility that these widely held views are mistaken—or at least only tell part of the story—and that morality and law have both socially constructed as well as natural elements entrenched in them. We will also examine whether morality and law in the form of social norms emerged without design or intention from a set of capacities for natural normativity that we share with other species.
Readings may include work by:
Kristin Andrews
Michael Giudice
Dan Kelly
Cristina Bicchieri
Frans de Waal
Kiley Hamlin
Joe Henrich
Stephen Stich
Ron Mallon
Philip Kitcher
Simon Fitzpatrick
Christine Korsgaard
H.L.A. Hart
Joseph Raz
Robin Kar
Michael Guttentag
Brian Tamanaha

Winter 2020

GS/PHIL 5615 3.0M Introduction to Wittenstein

GS/PHIL 5615 3.0 M Introduction to Wittgenstein

  • Wednesday 12:00–3:00pm
    Room: TBA (Glendon College)
  • Course Director: Professor Christopher Campbell
    E-mail: ccampbell@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: York Hall C 228

This course introduces students to the influential work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, focusing on his Tractatus logico-philosophicus and Philosophical investigations. The course also considers some of his other writings as well as some secondary literature.
**Integrated with GL/PHIL 4615

GS/PHIL 5800 3.0M Core Theoretical I

GS/PHIL 5800 3.0M Core Theoretical I

  • Day & Time: Fridays 11:30am-2:30pm
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S436 Ross
  • Course Director: Professor Christopher Campbell
    E-mail: ccampbell@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: York Hall, C228 (Glendon College)

This course offers an advanced survey of some central themes in contemporary theoretical philosophy. It is designed to ensure that students have sufficient background to pursue graduate-level research in theses areas, and required of MA students.

GS/PHIL 5801 3.0M Core Theoretical II

GS/PHIL 5801 3.0M Core Theoretical II

  • Day & Time: Fridays 3:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Christopher Campbell
    E-mail: ccampbell@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: York Hall, C228 (Glendon College)
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S436 Ross

This course provides a forum for further discussion of the central themes in contemporary theoretical philosophy. It is designed to prepare students to write the MA comprehensive examination in theoretical philosophy.

GS/PHIL 6390 3.0M Philosophy of Action

GS/PHIL 6390 3.0M Philosophy of Action

  • Day & Time: Tuesdays 11:30am-2:30pm
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Robert Myers
    E-mail: rmyers@yorku.ca
    Office: S431 Ross

Our focus will be first on the widespread turn from Anscombe to Davidson in the 1960s and early 1970s and then on the remarkable resurgence of support for Anscombe in recent years. Special attention will be paid throughout on the implications of this oscillation for debates in metaethics. My central claim will be that the differences separating Davidson’s philosophy of action from Anscombe’s are by no means as great as either his early followers or his recent critics have supposed, and that we learn more from both by treating them as allies rather than as foes.

GS/PHIL 6170 3.0M History of Analytic Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6170 3.0M History of Analytic Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Thursdays 2:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: RS 414F
  • Course Director: Professor Judy Pelham
    E-mail: pelham@yorku.ca
    Office: S440 Ross

This course moves chronologically through some foundational works of Frege and Russell, which laid the foundation for the development of modern logic, philosophy of language the philosophical thesis of logicism in the philosophy of mathematics, logical positivism in philosophy of science. Logicism is the thesis that all of mathematics is reducible to logic, and much of their early work was devoted to developing a logic that would accomplish the derivation.

We will read primary source material from Frege and Russell, as well as looking at some secondary source material, Alberto Coffa and Crispin Wright.

GS/PHIL 6410 3.0M Issues in Contemporary Moral Theory

GS/PHIL 6410 3.0M Issues in Contemporary Moral Theory

  • Day & Time: Mondays 2:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: TBA
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

This course focuses on recent developments in ethical theory. Topics may include: consequentialism, deontology, contractarianism, contractualism, virtue theory, feminist ethics, and moral particularism.

GS/PHIL 6240 3.0M Epistemology

GS/PHIL 6240 3.0M Epistemology

  • Day & Time: Tuesdays 2:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    E-mail: rarini@yorku.ca
    Office: S416 Ross

This course will focus on the recent ‘social turn’ in contemporary epistemology. We will consider issues related to the evidential status of testimony, expertise, and peer disagreement. We will also examine the debate over pragmatic encroachment: can what we should believe depend on things other than evidence, such as the demands of friendship or justice? Finally, we will consider several topics in public/political epistemology: what are the norms governing how we exchange information in democratic societies, and how have these been changed by modern communications technology? Readings will include work by Jennifer Lackey, Sandy Goldberg, Miranda Fricker, Michael Lynch, and Jason Stanley.

Fall/Winter 2019–2020

GS/PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

GS/PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

  • Day & Time: Wednesdays 2:30pm-5:30pm
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Alice MacLachlan
    E-mail: amacla@yorku.ca
    Office: S418 Ross
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S436 Ross

This course is required of all third-year PhD students. It is designed to help students complete the Two Paper Exam and write their dissertation proposal.

  • Auditing courses: students need to fill out the Course Transaction form, and bring it to the Graduate Program Assistant in the Graduate Program office in S429 Ross.

Not all courses listed below are offered every year.

Full Graduate Philosophy Course List

Philosophy 5040 3.0: Philosophical Paradoxes
Philosophy 5041 3.0: Contemporary Philosophy
Philosophy 5050 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 5126 3.0: Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 5150 3.0: Philosophy of Descartes
Philosophy 5200 3.0: Theoretical Ethics
Philosophy 5230 3.0: Origins & Development of Biology Theories
Philosophy 5235 3.0: Political Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5237 3.0: Moral Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5240 4.0: Topics in Argumentation
Philosophy 5250 3.0: Contemporary Issues in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 5260 3.0: Seminar in Gender and Transgender Theory
Philosophy 5270 3.0: Reasons and Desires
Philosophy 5310 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 5320 3.0: Philosophy of Language and Logic
Philosophy 5325 3.0: Investigating the Mind
Philosophy 5350 3.0: Topics in Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Philosophy of History
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Topics in the History of Philosophy: Rhetoric
Philosophy 5460 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 5500 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 5615 3.0: Introduction to Wittgenstein
Philosophy 5626 3.0: Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 5647 3.0: Topics in the Philosophy of Language: Truth
Philosophy 5670 3.0: Legal Philosophy between State and Transnationalism
Philosophy 5800 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5801 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5802 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5803 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 6010 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010 6.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010A 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6100 3.0: Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 6120 3.0: Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy 6130 3.0: Kant
Philosophy 6150 3.0: History of Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6155 3.0: Recent Trends in Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6170 3.0: History of Analytic Philosophy
Philosophy 6180 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 6185 3.0: Wittgenstein
Philosophy 6190 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 6230 3.0: Metaphysics
Philosophy 6235 3.0: Metaphysics of Science
Philosophy 6240 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 6245 3.0: New Directions in the Theory of Knowledge
Philosophy 6260 3.0: Philosophy of Science
Philosophy 6265 3.0: Philosophy of Physics
Philosophy 6275 3.0: Philosophy of Biology
Philosophy 6280 3.0: Philosophy of Social Science
Philosophy 6285 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 6290 3.0: Philosophy of Logic
Philosophy 6295 3.0: Argumentation Theory
Philosophy 6300 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6305 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6315 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6350 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy 6355 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of MInd
Philosophy 6360 3.0: Major Figures in Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6365 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6370 3.0: Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Philosophy 6390 3.0: Philosophy of Action
Philosophy 6400 3.0: Major Figures in Moral Philosophy
Philosophy 6410 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory
Philosophy 6415 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Metaethics
Philosophy 6420 3.0: Topics in Moral Psychology
Philosophy 6470 3.0: Topics in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 6490 3.0: Theory and Practice in Bioethics
Philosophy 6500 3.0: Major Figures in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6505 3.0: Major Problems in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6515 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6535 3.0: Recent Issues in Trans/Gender Theory
Philosophy 6540 3.0: Theories of International Justice and Rights
Philosophy 6550 3.0: Core Problems in Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6560 3.0: issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6570 3.0: Philosophy of International Law
Philosophy 6800 6.0: First-Year Seminar
Philosophy 6850 6.0: PhD Research Seminar
Philosophy 6860 6.0: PhD Research Seminar II

CROSS LISTED COURSES  FROM OTHER  PROGRAMS:

Philosophy 6135 3.0: Hegel
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Though 6605 3.0

Philosophy 6145 3.0: Philosophy and its Others: Recent Reflections
x-listed with (Same as) Humanities 6323 3.0

Philosophy 6340 3.0: Advanced History and Theory of Psychology
x-listed with (Same as) Psychology 6060D 3.0

Philosophy 6440 3.0: Philosophy of History
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Thought 6127 3.0.