Courses

Fall Term 2017 Courses

GS/PHIL 5041 3.0M Topics in Contemporary Philosophy

GS/PHIL 5041 3.0M Topics in Contemporary Philosophy
Philosophy 5041 3.0 (Integrated with AP/PHIL 4040)

  • Wednesday 2:30-5:30pm
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Lorraine Code
    E-mail: codelb@yorku.ca
    Office: S442 Ross

In this course we will examine some epistemological and ethical questions that inform and underlie ecological issues in the early 21st century western world, mainly with reference to the books required for the course (Ecological Thinking, The Politics of Epistemic Location and Red Skin White Masks, Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition) but also in several articles as specified in the course outline and in The Future of Whiteness. Questions about “our” place in the natural world and ways of relating responsibly to the world, both epistemologically, ethically, and politically will be a principal focus. The main purpose of the course is to introduce students to a way of thinking ecologically about the place of human beings in the natural and social world, and to direct this way of thinking toward an innovative approach to epistemology and the ethics/politics of knowing.

GS/PHIL 5237 3.0A Moral Philosophy II

GS/PHIL 5237 3.0A Moral Philosophy II

  • Tuesday 1:00-3:00
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Louis-Philippe Hodgson
    E-mail: lhodgson@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: York Hall C 208

This course proposes an advanced study of some central questions in ethical theory.  Topics are drawn from: Kantian ethics, contractualism, practical reasoning, choice and responsibility, theories of agency, and the limits of ethical theory.

GS/PHIL 5800 3.0A Core Theoretical I

GS/PHIL 5800 3.0A Core Theoretical I

  • Friday 11:30-2:30
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Henry Jackman
    E-mail: hjackman@yorku.ca
    Office: S434 Ross

This course offers an advanced survey of some central themes in contemporary theoretical philosophy. It is designed to ensure that students have sufficient background to pursue graduate-level research in theses areas, and required of MA students

GS/PHIL 5801 3.0A Core Theoretical II

GS/PHIL 5801 3.0A Core Theoretical II

  • Friday 1:30-3:30
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Muhammad Ali Khalidi
    E-mail: khalidi@yorku.ca
    Office: S431 Ross

This course provides a forum for further discussion of the central themes in contemporary theoretical philosophy. It is designed to prepare students to write the MA comprehensive examination in theoretical philosophy.

GS/PHIL 6470–Topics in Applied Ethics

GS/PHIL 6470–Topics in Applied Ethics

  • Tuesday 2:30-5:30
    Room: RS 536
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    Email: TBA
    Office: TBA

This seminar will focus on individual moral obligations amid systemic social oppression. In particular, we will look at microaggressions—small acts of indignity directed against members of marginalized groups, which contribute to large harmful effects. Microaggressions are particularly difficult to account for in ethical theory because they are often unintentional. We will consider issues of moral responsibility as well as practical epistemology (e.g. what can we know about our personal causal roles in large systems of injustice, or about our unconscious biases?) Readings will include parts of Iris Marion Young’s Responsibility for Justice, Miranda Fricker’s Epistemic Injustice, and Professor Rini’s manuscript-in-progress on the ethics of microaggression.

GS/PHIL 6420–Topics in Moral Psychology

GS/PHIL 6420–Topics in Moral Psychology

  • Thursday 11:30-2:30
    Room: RS 421
  • Instructor: Professor Kristin Andrews
    E-mail: andrewsk@yorku.ca
    Office: S420 RossPHIL

In this seminar, we will be examining the issues and challenges related to Moral Psychology.

Texts include:

  • Valerie Tiberius: Moral Psychology: A Contemporary Introduction
  • Owen Flanagan The Geography of Morals: Varieties of Moral Possibility
  • Daniel Goleman and Richard Davidson: Altered Traits: Science Reveals How Meditation Changes your Mind, Brain, and Body

We will also be reading chapters from The Moral Psychology Handbook, Doris et al. eds. and selected articles.

Students will be required to present an article and create a handout for the seminar participants, to turn in a draft of a final paper, to offer comments to another student on their paper, and to revise their draft paper in light of comments received during the class conference at the end of term.

PHIL 6420 Moral Psychology Seminar Summary 2017 18

GS/PHIL 6400 3.0A Major Figures in Moral Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6400 3.0A Major Figures in Moral Philosophy

  • Monday 2:30-5:30
    Room: RS 421
  • Instructor: Professor Alice MacLachlan
    E-mail: amacla@yorku.ca
    Office: S418 Ross

This course focuses on the moral philosophy of Smith and Hume.

PHIL 6400 Course Description

GS/PHIL 6800 3.0A First–Year Seminar

GS/PHIL 6800 3.0A First–Year Seminar

  • Friday 11:30 - 2:30
    Room: RS 414F
  • Course Director: Professor Louis-Philippe Hodgson
    E-mail: lhodgson@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: C 208 York Hall
    Course Director: Professor Jacob Beck
    E-mail: jbeck@yorku.ca
    Office: S439 Ross

This course is required of all first-year PhD students. It is designed to familiarize them with the Graduate Program in Philosophy and to impart the skills needed to complete the PhD. Students will be reading John Doris’ book Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Ignorance, and Agency.

Philosophy 6010 3.0: Directed Readings

Philosophy 6010 3.0 Directed Readings

Directed Reading Courses: Students wanting to Enroll in a Directed Reading course, PHIL 6010 3.0 or PHIL 6010 6.0. A brief rationale explaining how the course will advance your program of study, a short bibliography and/or readings, must be approved by the Course Director. Directed reading course forms must be completed by the student, then signed by the course director and returned to the program office at least three to four weeks prior to the start of the term in which the student enrolls in the reading course. This course is by permission only.

For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Assistant.

Philosophy 6010 6.0: Directed Readings

Philosophy 6010 6.0 Directed Readings

Directed Reading Courses: Students wanting to Enroll in a Directed Reading course, PHIL 6010 3.0 or PHIL 6010 6.0. A brief rationale explaining how the course will advance your program of study, a short bibliography and/or readings, must be approved by the Course Director. Directed reading course forms must be completed by the student, then signed by the course director and returned to the program office at least three to four weeks prior to the start of the term in which the student enrolls in the reading course. This course is by permission only.

For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Assistant.

Winter Term 2018 Courses

GS/PHIL 5460 3.0M Philosophical Logic

GS/PHIL 5460 3.0M Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 5460 3.0 (Integrated with AP/PHIL 4460 3.0)

  • Thursday 11:30-2:30
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Judy Pelham
    E-mail: pelham@yorku.ca
    Office: S440 Ross

This course provides students with the background in logic necessary to do graduate work in many areas of analytic philosophy. This course presupposes students have successfully completed an introductory course in sentential and predicate logic.

GS/PHIL 5500 3.0 A Topics in Feminist Philosophy

GS/PHIL 5500 3.0 A Topics in Feminist Philosophy

  • Wednesday 2:30-5:30
    Room: VH 1152
  • Course Director: Professor Lorraine Code
    E-mail: codelb@yorku.ca
    Office: S442 Ross

The “epistemological project” is subject to multiple interrogations in the early twenty-first century. “Naturalistic” epistemologists – both Quinean and other – take issue with the abstractions and the dislocated concentration on “knowledge in general” that characterize the epistemologies of the Anglo-American mainstream. Feminists, Foucauldians, and other postcolonial and anti-racist thinkers demonstrate the connections between knowledge and positions of power and privilege, and hence the complicity of orthodox epistemology in an Enlightenment legacy of dominance and subordination. Together, many of these critiques are exposing the politics of knowledge that underpin claims to disinterested knowledge and objectivity. In this course we will consider some implications of these critiques.

GS/PHIL 5615 3.0M Introduction to Wittgenstein

GS/PHIL 5615 3.0M Introduction to Wittgenstein

  • Monday 12:00-3:00
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Christopher Alan Campbell
    E-mail: ccampbell@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: York Hall C228

This course introduces students to the influential work of Ludwig Wittgenstein, focusing on his Tractatus Logico-philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations. The course also considers some of his other writings as well as some secondary literature.

PHIL 5615 Course Description--WI 18

GS/PHIL 5802 3.0M Core Practical I

GS/PHIL 5802 3.0M Core Practical I

  • Friday 11:30-2:30
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Michael Giudice
    E-mail: giudice@yorku.ca
    Office: S432 Ross

This course offers an advanced survey of some central themes in contemporary practical philosophy. It is designed to ensure that students have sufficient background to pursue graduate-level research in these areas, and required of MA students.

PHIL 5802 outline, Winter 2018

GS/PHIL 5803 3.0M Core Practical II

GS/PHIL 5803 3.0M Core Practical II

  • Friday 1:30-3:30
    Room: RS 414F
  • Course Director: Professor Susan Dimock
    E-mail: dimock@yorku.ca
    Office: S432 Ross

This course provides a forum for further discussion of the central themes in contemporary practical philosophy. It is designed to prepare students to write the MA comprehensive examination in practical philosophy.

5803 Syllabus, W18

GS/PHIL 6340 3.0 Advanced History and Theory of Psychology

GS/PHIL 6340 3.0 Advanced History and Theory of Psychology
(cross-listed to Psychology 6060D)

  • Wednesday 11:30-2:30
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Christopher D Green
    E-mail: christo@yorku.ca
    Office: BSB 286

An advanced seminar devoted to the historical background and development of Darwin's evolutionary theory, and to the influence  of that theory on the subsequent history of psychology.

GS/PHIL 6100 3.0 M Ancient Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6100 3.0 M Ancient Philosophy

  • Thursday 2:30-5:30
    Room: RS 421
  • Course Director: Professor Gerard Naddaf
    E-mail: naddaf@yorku.ca
    Office: S 443 Ross

This course will focus on God and Nature in Ancient Greek philosophy.

GS/PHIL 6365 3.0 M Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology

GS/PHIL 6365 3.0 M Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology

  • Monday 2:30-5:30
    Room: RS 536
  • Course Director: Professor Duff Waring
    E-mail: dwaring@yorku.ca
    Office: S 428 Ross

Recent work in philosophy of psychiatry has drawn on both analytic and existential/phenomenological approaches to understanding mental disorders. There is much unease about the concepts and methodologies that are used to describe, explain, and classify them. There are also questions about how the subjective experience of persons might inform an understanding of mental disorders as impoverished ways of being-in-the-world. Should we understand mental disorders as biologically based dysfunctions of the brain or should we take a phenomenological approach and view them as distortions of a person’s pre-reflective sense of “belonging to a shared world”? How might these approaches constructively inform each other? What amounts to a coherent psychiatric account of a) the mental and b) disorder? This course is focused on contemporary work that explores analytic and existential/phenomenological approaches to the mental disorder known as “depression.”

GS/PHIL 6370 3.0M Philosophy of Cognitive Science

GS/PHIL 6370 3.0M Philosophy of Cognitive Science

  • Tuesday 11:30-2:30
    Room: RS 501
  • Course Director: Professor Jacob Beck
    E-mail: jbeck@yorku.ca
    Office: S439 Ross

This course will focus on the philosophy of perception.

GS/PHIL 6505 3.0M Major Problems in Political Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6505 3.0M Major Problems in Political Philosophy

  • Thursday 2:30-5:30
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Susan Dimock
    E-mail: dimock@yorku.ca
    Office: MC 237A

This course focuses on one or more major problems in political philosophy, including, but not limited to, the problem of justice, equality, the authority of the state, the rights of individuals, the nature of citizenship, the ownership of property, the problem of freedom, the redistribution of wealth, and the nature of social contracts.

Philosophy 6010 3.0: Directed Readings

Philosophy 6010 3.0 Directed Readings

Directed Reading Courses: Students wanting to Enroll in a Directed Reading course, PHIL 6010 3.0 or PHIL 6010 6.0. A brief rationale explaining how the course will advance your program of study, a short bibliography and/or readings, must be approved by the Course Director. Directed reading course forms must be completed by the student, then signed by the course director and returned to the program office at least three to four weeks prior to the start of the term in which the student enrolls in the reading course. This course is by permission only.

For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Assistant.

Philosophy 6010 6.0: Directed Readings

Philosophy 6010 6.0 Directed Readings

Directed Reading Courses: Students wanting to Enroll in a Directed Reading course, PHIL 6010 3.0 or PHIL 6010 6.0. A brief rationale explaining how the course will advance your program of study, a short bibliography and/or readings, must be approved by the Course Director. Directed reading course forms must be completed by the student, then signed by the course director and returned to the program office at least three to four weeks prior to the start of the term in which the student enrolls in the reading course. This course is by permission only.

For more information, please contact the Graduate Program Assistant.

Fall/Winter 2017–2018

GS/PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

GS/PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

  • Friday 11:30-2:30
    Room: RS 432
  • Course Director: Professor Kristin Andrews
    E-mail: andrewsk@yorku.ca
    Office: S420 Ross
    Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    Email: TBA
    Office: TBA

This course is required of all third-year PhD students. It is designed to help students complete the Two Paper Exam and write their dissertation proposal.

  • Auditing courses: students need to fill out the Course Transaction form, and bring it to the Graduate Program Assistant in the Graduate Program office in S429 Ross.

Not all courses listed below are offered every year.

Full Graduate Philosophy Course List

Philosophy 5040 3.0: Philosophical Paradoxes
Philosophy 5041 3.0: Contemporary Philosophy
Philosophy 5050 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 5126 3.0: Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 5150 3.0: Philosophy of Descartes
Philosophy 5200 3.0: Theoretical Ethics
Philosophy 5230 3.0: Origins & Development of Biology Theories
Philosophy 5235 3.0: Political Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5237 3.0: Moral Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5240 4.0: Topics in Argumentation
Philosophy 5250 3.0: Contemporary Issues in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 5260 3.0: Seminar in Gender and Transgender Theory
Philosophy 5270 3.0: Reasons and Desires
Philosophy 5310 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 5320 3.0: Philosophy of Language and Logic
Philosophy 5325 3.0: Investigating the Mind
Philosophy 5350 3.0: Topics in Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Philosophy of History
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Topics in the History of Philosophy: Rhetoric
Philosophy 5460 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 5500 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 5615 3.0: Introduction to Wittgenstein
Philosophy 5626 3.0: Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 5647 3.0: Topics in the Philosophy of Language: Truth
Philosophy 5670 3.0: Legal Philosophy between State and Transnationalism
Philosophy 5800 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5801 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5802 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5803 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 6010 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010 6.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010A 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6100 3.0: Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 6120 3.0: Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy 6130 3.0: Kant
Philosophy 6150 3.0: History of Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6155 3.0: Recent Trends in Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6170 3.0: History of Analytic Philosophy
Philosophy 6180 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 6185 3.0: Wittgenstein
Philosophy 6190 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 6230 3.0: Metaphysics
Philosophy 6235 3.0: Metaphysics of Science
Philosophy 6240 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 6245 3.0: New Directions in the Theory of Knowledge
Philosophy 6260 3.0: Philosophy of Science
Philosophy 6265 3.0: Philosophy of Physics
Philosophy 6275 3.0: Philosophy of Biology
Philosophy 6280 3.0: Philosophy of Social Science
Philosophy 6285 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 6290 3.0: Philosophy of Logic
Philosophy 6295 3.0: Argumentation Theory
Philosophy 6300 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6305 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6315 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6350 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy 6355 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of MInd
Philosophy 6360 3.0: Major Figures in Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6365 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6370 3.0: Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Philosophy 6390 3.0: Philosophy of Action
Philosophy 6400 3.0: Major Figures in Moral Philosophy
Philosophy 6410 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory
Philosophy 6415 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Metaethics
Philosophy 6420 3.0: Topics in Moral Psychology
Philosophy 6470 3.0: Topics in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 6490 3.0: Theory and Practice in Bioethics
Philosophy 6500 3.0: Major Figures in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6505 3.0: Major Problems in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6515 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6535 3.0: Recent Issues in Trans/Gender Theory
Philosophy 6540 3.0: Theories of International Justice and Rights
Philosophy 6550 3.0: Core Problems in Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6560 3.0: issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6570 3.0: Philosophy of International Law
Philosophy 6800 6.0: First-Year Seminar
Philosophy 6850 6.0: PhD Research Seminar
Philosophy 6860 6.0: PhD Research Seminar II

CROSS LISTED COURSES  FROM OTHER  PROGRAMS:

Philosophy 6135 3.0: Hegel
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Though 6605 3.0

Philosophy 6145 3.0: Philosophy and its Others: Recent Reflections
x-listed with (Same as) Humanities 6323 3.0

Philosophy 6340 3.0: Advanced History and Theory of Psychology
x-listed with (Same as) Psychology 6060D 3.0

Philosophy 6440 3.0: Philosophy of History
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Thought 6127 3.0.