Courses

Fall 2021

PHIL 5340A Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

GS/PHIL 5340A Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

  • Day & Time: Thursday 8:30–11:30am
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: TBA
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 5802 3.0A Core Practical I

GS/PHIL 5802 3.0A Core Practical I

  • Day & Time: Friday 11:30–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor P. Mossavi
    E-mail: pmoosavi@yorku.ca
    Office:

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 5803 3.0A Core Practical II

GS/PHIL 5803 3.0A Core Practical II

  • Day & Time: Friday 3:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Robert Myers
    E-mail: rmyers@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 431

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6170 3.0A History of Analytic Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6170 History of Analytic Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Mondays 9:30–11:30am
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Judy Pelham
    E-mail: pelham@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 440

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6370 3.0A Philosophy of Cognitive Science

GS/PHIL 6370 3.0A Philosophy of Cognitive Science

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Verena Gottschling
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6560 3.0A Issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6560 3.0A Issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 9:30am–12:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: TBA
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6666 3.0A Exegesis

GS/PHIL 6666 Exegesis

  • Day & Time: Mondays, T & R 8:30–11:30am
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Stanley Tweyman
    E-mail: stweyman@yorku.ca
    Office: TBA

Course Description:
Both Descartes and Hume (Descartes 1596-1650, Hume 1711-1776) write of the need for a revolution in philosophy, if philosophy is to advance knowledge.

The attempt to understand a text presents problems for the reader, and these problems are increased when the author is writing for a specific learned audience, while at the same time attempting to reach a more general audience. This esoteric/ exoteric distinction is prevalent (albeit in vastly different ways) in Rene Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy, and David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. In this course, students will be introduced to the exegetical tools required to apprehend these texts. We will come to see that these exegetical tools are provided through 1) an understanding of the cultural milieu in which each author is writing; 2) through an understanding of the type of scientific methodology that each thinker holds constitutes the correct (better, the only) methodological approach for the advancement of learning generally; and 3) various passages (both within, and without, our primary texts) through which each thinker provides some guidance for an understanding of their work. This course should provide an appreciation of the value of exegesis, and make students sensitive to the fact that the meaning of a passage or text goes well beyond the words on the page.

Descates: Descartes’ main criticism of philosophy is that it lacks a recognized method for resolving philosophical problems, and, as a result, no universally accepted body of philosophical knowledge exists. He holds that philosophy does not have to develop a new method, but rather should emulate and modify the method in an existing discipline, where there is universal agreement that a body of indubitable knowledge has been generated. Descartes holds that such a body of knowledge exists in mathematics - arithmetic and geometry. For philosophy to be successful, therefore, Descartes argues that philosophers should emulate and adapt the method of geometry to philosophical topics and problems. Descartes’ attempt to accomplish this is presented in his Rules for the Direction of the Understanding (the Regulae). However, in his Meditations on First Philosophy, the work in which he seeks the first principles of human knowledge (‘what must be known before anything else can be known’), Descartes insists that the deductive method utilized in mathematics will not assist in uncovering these first principles, which, when understood, will be found to be self-evident. In the Descartes portion of the course, the focus will be on Descartes’ method for uncovering the first principles of human knowledge.

Hume: In the Introduction to his Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume complains about the endless debates in philosophy, and the fact that philosophers lack an accepted effective method through which such debates can be resolved. In seeking to address this problem, he argues that the first step ought to be an understanding of the knower, which he refers to as human nature. Hume further argues that the study of human nature should utilize the same method that Newton employed in studying the natural world – experience and observation. Now, while this is the approach that Hume undertakes in the Treatise, in his later works, particularly in his Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding and Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, he adds significantly to the methodological approach in the Treatise, since many of the topics covered in these works, for example, the existence and nature of God; miracles; divine providence and a future state, do not lend themselves to a Newtonian-type philosophical investigation. In the Hume portion of the course, the focus will be on the different methodologies he utilizes, depending on the subject of the inquiry.

PHIL 6800 3.0A First-Year Seminar

GS/PHIL 6800 3.0A First-Year Seminar

  • Day & Time: Friday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    E-mail: rarini@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 416
  • Course Director: Professor Julianne Chung
    E-mail: jnchung@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 439A

Course Description: Information to follow.

Winter 2022

PHIL 5340M Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

GS/PHIL 5340M Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

  • Day & Time: Thursday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: TBA
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 5800 3.0M Core Theoretical I

GS/PHIL 5800 3.0M Core Theoretical I

  • Day & Time: Friday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S 4326
  • Course Director: Professor Julianne Chung
    E-mail: jnchung@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 439A

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 5801 3.0M Core Theoretical II

GS/PHIL 5801 3.0M Core Theoretical II

  • Day & Time: Friday 3:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Julianne Chung
    E-mail: jnchung@yorku.ca
    Office: 439A
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S 4326

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6365 3.0M Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology

GS/PHIL 6365 3.0M Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Duff Waring
    E-mail: dwaring@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 428

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6410 3.0M Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory

GS/PHIL 6410 3.0M Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    E-mail: rarini@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 146

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6500 3.0M Major Problems in Political Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6500 3.0M Major Problems in Political Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Wednesday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: L.P. Hodgson
    E-mail: lhodgson@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: RS 444

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6550 Core Problems in Legal Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6550 Core Problems in Legal Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Mondays 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Michael Giudice
    E-mail: giudice@yorku.ca
    Office: TBA

Course Description: Information to follow.

Fall/Winter 2021–22

PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

GS/PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

  • Day & Time: Wednesday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Robert Myers
    E-mail: rmyers@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 431
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S 4326

Course Description: Information to follow.

  • Auditing courses: students need to fill out the Course Transaction form, and bring it to the Graduate Program Assistant in the Graduate Program office in S429 Ross.

Not all courses listed below are offered every year.

Full Graduate Philosophy Course List

Philosophy 5040 3.0: Philosophical Paradoxes
Philosophy 5041 3.0: Contemporary Philosophy
Philosophy 5050 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 5126 3.0: Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 5150 3.0: Philosophy of Descartes
Philosophy 5200 3.0: Theoretical Ethics
Philosophy 5230 3.0: Origins & Development of Biology Theories
Philosophy 5235 3.0: Political Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5237 3.0: Moral Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5240 4.0: Topics in Argumentation
Philosophy 5250 3.0: Contemporary Issues in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 5260 3.0: Seminar in Gender and Transgender Theory
Philosophy 5270 3.0: Reasons and Desires
Philosophy 5310 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 5320 3.0: Philosophy of Language and Logic
Philosophy 5325 3.0: Investigating the Mind
Philosophy 5350 3.0: Topics in Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Philosophy of History
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Topics in the History of Philosophy: Rhetoric
Philosophy 5460 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 5500 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 5615 3.0: Introduction to Wittgenstein
Philosophy 5626 3.0: Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 5647 3.0: Topics in the Philosophy of Language: Truth
Philosophy 5670 3.0: Legal Philosophy between State and Transnationalism
Philosophy 5800 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5801 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5802 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5803 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 6010 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010 6.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010A 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6100 3.0: Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 6120 3.0: Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy 6130 3.0: Kant
Philosophy 6150 3.0: History of Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6155 3.0: Recent Trends in Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6170 3.0: History of Analytic Philosophy
Philosophy 6180 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 6185 3.0: Wittgenstein
Philosophy 6190 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 6230 3.0: Metaphysics
Philosophy 6235 3.0: Metaphysics of Science
Philosophy 6240 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 6245 3.0: New Directions in the Theory of Knowledge
Philosophy 6260 3.0: Philosophy of Science
Philosophy 6265 3.0: Philosophy of Physics
Philosophy 6275 3.0: Philosophy of Biology
Philosophy 6280 3.0: Philosophy of Social Science
Philosophy 6285 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 6290 3.0: Philosophy of Logic
Philosophy 6295 3.0: Argumentation Theory
Philosophy 6300 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6305 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6315 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6350 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy 6355 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of MInd
Philosophy 6360 3.0: Major Figures in Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6365 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6370 3.0: Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Philosophy 6390 3.0: Philosophy of Action
Philosophy 6400 3.0: Major Figures in Moral Philosophy
Philosophy 6410 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory
Philosophy 6415 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Metaethics
Philosophy 6420 3.0: Topics in Moral Psychology
Philosophy 6470 3.0: Topics in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 6490 3.0: Theory and Practice in Bioethics
Philosophy 6500 3.0: Major Figures in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6505 3.0: Major Problems in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6515 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6535 3.0: Recent Issues in Trans/Gender Theory
Philosophy 6540 3.0: Theories of International Justice and Rights
Philosophy 6550 3.0: Core Problems in Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6560 3.0: issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6570 3.0: Philosophy of International Law
Philosophy 6800 6.0: First-Year Seminar
Philosophy 6850 6.0: PhD Research Seminar
Philosophy 6860 6.0: PhD Research Seminar II

CROSS LISTED COURSES  FROM OTHER  PROGRAMS:

Philosophy 6135 3.0: Hegel
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Though 6605 3.0

Philosophy 6145 3.0: Philosophy and its Others: Recent Reflections
x-listed with (Same as) Humanities 6323 3.0

Philosophy 6340 3.0: Advanced History and Theory of Psychology
x-listed with (Same as) Psychology 6060D 3.0

Philosophy 6440 3.0: Philosophy of History
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Thought 6127 3.0.