Courses

Fall 2021

PHIL 5340A Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

GS/PHIL 5340A Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

  • Day & Time: Thursday 8:30–11:30am
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: TBA
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

This course provides an overview of social and ethical issues arising from emerging Artificial Intelligence technology. The course will explore both existing and future technology applications, with a focus on learning to recognize and anticipate novel ethical challenges. By practicing ethical analysis in written and oral presentation, students will develop future-oriented skills applicable to technologies not yet invented. Topics, that are currently relevant or in the near future, will include algorithmic transparency and bias, big data surveillance and privacy, autonomous robotics in transport and warfare, economic and legal consequences of labour automation, use of robots as caregivers, and the effects of AI-human interaction on human ethical behaviour. Topics, that are relevant in the long term, will include theoretical issues such as whether AI can or should ever make independent ethical decisions, whether AI might ever be entitled to moral rights of its own, and how humanity can contain the risks of 'superintelligent' future AI. The course will also consider whether the tech industry needs its own set of AI-related professional ethics (modelled on medical, business, and engineering ethics). What are the distinctive social responsibilities of AI companies and research institutions? What are the obligations of individual AI professionals?

PHIL 5802 3.0A Core Practical I

GS/PHIL 5802 3.0A Core Practical I

  • Day & Time: Friday 11:30–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor P. Mossavi
    E-mail: pmoosavi@yorku.ca
    Office:

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 5803 3.0A Core Practical II

GS/PHIL 5803 3.0A Core Practical II

  • Day & Time: Friday 3:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Robert Myers
    E-mail: rmyers@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 431

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6170 3.0A History of Analytic Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6170 History of Analytic Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Mondays 9:30am–12:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Judy Pelham
    E-mail: pelham@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 440

History of Early Analytic Philosophy:
Russell’s Theory of Propositions

Description: This seminar will focus on understanding Bertrand Russell’s theory of propositions as it developed from The Principles of Mathematics version, through the phase of Principia Mathematica, and on to the Theory of Knowledge manuscript. For Russell, the nature of propositions was closely tied to his metaphysical and epistemological views, and he struggled to develop a notion that would be adequate to the expression of both mathematical and contingent truths, as well as giving a basis for understanding language and thought.

The development of the course will be primarily an investigation of the history from various primary sources. But discussion and integration of secondary sources, and more recent work on propositions will not be excluded.

Meeting and Organization of the course: This is not an in-person course. I am expecting that in addition to doing the course readings and other usual seminar work, the class will meet live for two hours once a week on Zoom via the course website. I am expecting this live and (I hope ) face to face via internet communication to be an important part of the seminar. This will be our time for discussion of the readings. We can reserve roughly another hour per week for various sorts of online written communication. I can provide background to readings in a written or recorded format, and we will raise questions of interpretation and clarification online so that we can help each other with our reading and study of the readings.

Prerequisites: Graduate students will be helped by having an introductory course in logic, but the focus of the course will not be technical. I expect students to have an interest in either metaphysics, epistemology, logic, and or the status of logic within philosophy. I can review logical material that is important for understanding the course as needed.

A few Primary Source Texts:

  • Carnap, Rudolf. 1959. "The Old and the New Logic." In Logical Positivism, edited by Alfred J. Ayer and translated by Isaac Levi, 133–46. New York: Free Press, 1959.
  • Frege, Gottlob. 1974. The Foundations of Arithmetic. A logic-mathematical enquiry into the concept of number. Edited and Translated by J. L. Austin. Oxford: Blackwell, second revised edition.
  • Russell, Bertrand. 1903. The Principles of Mathematics. London: Allen and Unwin.
  • ____________. 1973. Essays in Analysis. Edited by D. Lackey. New York: George Braziller. [This anthology contains several important papers by Russell, all of which are obtainable via means.]
  • ____________. 1984. Theory of Knowledge: the 1913 manuscript. In The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell Vol. VII, eds. E.R. Eames and K. Blackwell. London: Allen and Unwin.
  • Whitehead and Russell. 1910. Principia Mathematica Volumes I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [We will review selections from the introduction to this work.]

PHIL 6370 3.0A Philosophy of Cognitive Science

GS/PHIL 6370 3.0A Philosophy of Cognitive Science

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Verena Gottschling
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

Almost everyone agrees that we have sensations, are in pain, and possess consciousness. Interestingly, this is where agreement seems to end. Not only is it controversial how to best understand what they are, their role in and influence on other cognitive processes is clear, but it remains controversial how best to explain it. After covering some earlier psychological theories (including James, Hume) we will draw on contemporary related theories of consciousness, emotion, affect, and hot cognition. We cannot cover it all, but we will get into some of the main contemporary theories of consciousness and emotion, access theories, representational theories and metacognitive accounts. Authors we cover will be Tye, Prinz, Rosenthal, Lycan, Solomon, Aydede, Bain, etc. In part three we will look at the influence of hot cognition on decisions, the emotional experience of art and architecture, or the emotional and cognitive effects of interspecies relationships, such as between humans and (therapy-) animals. Which of these three we pick will be determined by student interest.

PHIL 6560 3.0A Issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6560 3.0A Issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 9:30am–12:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Margaret O'Brien
    E-mail: Margaret.OBrien@ed.ac.uk
    Office: TBA

This course focuses on our practices of accountability and how we make amends in the main spheres of our lives—personal, political, and legal. We will examine issues around criticism and blame, punishment, standing, apology, damages, forgiveness, and mercy. The goal is to better understand how we can engage in criticism and blame fairly. As well as better understand what it is to forgive someone for their wrongdoing and how the wrongdoer may make amends. We will set out to answer questions such as: What undermines one’s standing to blame? Why is hypocrisy so bad? Does the state have standing to prosecute criminals? What justifies the legal concept of standing? How does thinking about the role of apology in our personal lives illuminate the concept of damages in tort law?

PHIL 6666 3.0A Exegesis

GS/PHIL 6666 Exegesis

  • Day & Time: Mondays, T & R 8:30–11:30am
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Stanley Tweyman
    E-mail: stweyman@yorku.ca
    Office: TBA

Course Description:
Both Descartes and Hume (Descartes 1596-1650, Hume 1711-1776) write of the need for a revolution in philosophy, if philosophy is to advance knowledge.

The attempt to understand a text presents problems for the reader, and these problems are increased when the author is writing for a specific learned audience, while at the same time attempting to reach a more general audience. This esoteric/ exoteric distinction is prevalent (albeit in vastly different ways) in Rene Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy, and David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. In this course, students will be introduced to the exegetical tools required to apprehend these texts. We will come to see that these exegetical tools are provided through 1) an understanding of the cultural milieu in which each author is writing; 2) through an understanding of the type of scientific methodology that each thinker holds constitutes the correct (better, the only) methodological approach for the advancement of learning generally; and 3) various passages (both within, and without, our primary texts) through which each thinker provides some guidance for an understanding of their work. This course should provide an appreciation of the value of exegesis, and make students sensitive to the fact that the meaning of a passage or text goes well beyond the words on the page.

Descates: Descartes’ main criticism of philosophy is that it lacks a recognized method for resolving philosophical problems, and, as a result, no universally accepted body of philosophical knowledge exists. He holds that philosophy does not have to develop a new method, but rather should emulate and modify the method in an existing discipline, where there is universal agreement that a body of indubitable knowledge has been generated. Descartes holds that such a body of knowledge exists in mathematics - arithmetic and geometry. For philosophy to be successful, therefore, Descartes argues that philosophers should emulate and adapt the method of geometry to philosophical topics and problems. Descartes’ attempt to accomplish this is presented in his Rules for the Direction of the Understanding (the Regulae). However, in his Meditations on First Philosophy, the work in which he seeks the first principles of human knowledge (‘what must be known before anything else can be known’), Descartes insists that the deductive method utilized in mathematics will not assist in uncovering these first principles, which, when understood, will be found to be self-evident. In the Descartes portion of the course, the focus will be on Descartes’ method for uncovering the first principles of human knowledge.

Hume: In the Introduction to his Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume complains about the endless debates in philosophy, and the fact that philosophers lack an accepted effective method through which such debates can be resolved. In seeking to address this problem, he argues that the first step ought to be an understanding of the knower, which he refers to as human nature. Hume further argues that the study of human nature should utilize the same method that Newton employed in studying the natural world – experience and observation. Now, while this is the approach that Hume undertakes in the Treatise, in his later works, particularly in his Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding and Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, he adds significantly to the methodological approach in the Treatise, since many of the topics covered in these works, for example, the existence and nature of God; miracles; divine providence and a future state, do not lend themselves to a Newtonian-type philosophical investigation. In the Hume portion of the course, the focus will be on the different methodologies he utilizes, depending on the subject of the inquiry.

PHIL 6800 3.0A First-Year Seminar

GS/PHIL 6800 3.0A First-Year Seminar

  • Day & Time: Friday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    E-mail: rarini@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 416
  • Course Director: Professor Julianne Chung
    E-mail: jnchung@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 439A

Course Description: Information to follow.

Winter 2022

PHIL 5340M Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

GS/PHIL 5340M Ethics & Societal Implications of Artificial Intelligence

  • Day & Time: Thursday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: TBA
    E-mail: TBA
    Office: TBA

This course provides an overview of social and ethical issues arising from emerging Artificial Intelligence technology. The course will explore both existing and future technology applications, with a focus on learning to recognize and anticipate novel ethical challenges. By practicing ethical analysis in written and oral presentation, students will develop future-oriented skills applicable to technologies not yet invented. Topics, that are currently relevant or in the near future, will include algorithmic transparency and bias, big data surveillance and privacy, autonomous robotics in transport and warfare, economic and legal consequences of labour automation, use of robots as caregivers, and the effects of AI-human interaction on human ethical behavior. Topics, that are relevant in the long term, will include theoretical issues such as whether AI can or should ever make independent ethical decisions, whether AI might ever be entitled to moral rights of its own, and how humanity can contain the risks of 'superintelligent' future AI. The course will also consider whether the tech industry needs its own set of AI-related professional ethics (modeled on medical, business, and engineering ethics). What are the distinctive social responsibilities of AI companies and research institutions? What are the obligations of individual AI professionals?

PHIL 5800 3.0M Core Theoretical I

GS/PHIL 5800 3.0M Core Theoretical I

  • Day & Time: Friday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S 4326
  • Course Director: Professor Julianne Chung
    E-mail: jnchung@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 439A

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 5801 3.0M Core Theoretical II

GS/PHIL 5801 3.0M Core Theoretical II

  • Day & Time: Friday 3:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Julianne Chung
    E-mail: jnchung@yorku.ca
    Office: 439A
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S 4326

Course Description: Information to follow.

PHIL 6365 3.0M Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology

GS/PHIL 6365 3.0M Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 11:30am–2:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Duff Waring
    E-mail: dwaring@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 428

Course Description: This is a course on the philosophy of medicine, with a particular emphasis on psychiatry. There is a resurgent interest in research on the therapeutic potential of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy (PAP) as a treatment for some mental disorders (e.g., depression) as well as the “existential suffering” of patients facing death from terminal illness. Psychedelics, e.g., psilocybin and LSD, are powerful psychoactive substances that alter perception and mood and affect numerous cognitive processes. Initial results from stage 1 and 2 research trials are limited but cautiously indicate therapeutic promise. Psychopharmacology is the predominant mode of treatment in contemporary psychiatry, and reflects a biomedical model whereby drugs are designed to specifically target alleged biochemical dysfunctions of the brain. Pharmacologic effects are understood as reflecting a drug’s molecular composition, and are distinguished from a variety of other factors that influence a drug experience, e.g., a patient’s expectation of benefit and belief in the drug’s effectiveness. Since the variable effects of PAP are induced in no small part by set (the personality, preparation, expectation, and intention of the person undergoing the experience) and setting (the physical, social, and cultural environment in which the experience takes place), it does not fit easily, if at all, in the biomedical treatment model, which requires isolating pharmacologic effects from non-drug influences (Hartogsohn 2016). Neither does the “mystical-type” psychedelic experience which is thought by some to be a crucial benefit of PAP. Some claim that PAP can promote positive mental health and valuable personal and metaphysical insights in the absence of mental disorder or terminal illness. Critics worry that PAP can induce positive illusions and metaphysical delusions. Hence the “Comforting Delusion Objection” addressed by Letheby (2021), who defends a naturalistic account by which the epistemic profile of PAP involves less risks and more benefit than one might think. PAP raises numerous conceptual questions about research trial design, the model of psychiatry that might accommodate it, and the kinds of experience it induces. This course will explore four questions: 1) What is the ethical justification for this research on patients? 2) What types of research trial design might best be used to assess the purported benefits of PAP? 3) What models of a) psychiatry and b) pharmacological drug action might accommodate PAP? 4) What is the epistemic warrant of the “mystical” and “noetic” facets of the psychedelic experience? Time permitting, we can also consider what psychedelics might tell us about the nature of the self.

Text:
Chris Letheby, The Philosophy of Psychedelics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021). 272 pages.

Articles and book chapters:
The following sources are available online via a Google search or through the YorkU Libraries system.

  • Dominic Murphy, “The Medical Model and the Philosophy of Science,” in The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry, eds. K.W.M. Fulford, Martin Davies, Richard G.T. Gipps, George Graham, John Z. Sadler, Giovanni Stanghellini, & Tim Thornton (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013), 966-986.
  • Owen Flanagan & George Graham, “Truth and Sanity: Positive Illusions, Spiritual Delusions, and Metaphysical Hallucinations,” in Extraordinary Science and Psychiatry, eds. Jeffrey Poland & Serife Tekin (Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, 2017), 293-313.
  • Andrea Lavazza, “Ways of Being Well: Realistic and Unrealistic Wellbeing,” in New Perspectives on Realism, eds. Luca Taddio & Kevin W. Molin (Milan: Mimesis International, 2017), 237-252. Available at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315825108_Ways_of_Being_Well_Realistic_and_Unrealistic_Wellbeing
  • Adam Greif & Martin Surkala. “Compassionate Use of Psychedelics,” Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2020): 485-496.
  • Nicolas Langlitz, “Is There a Place for Psychedelics in Philosophy?” Common Knowledge 22, no 3 (2016): 373-384.
  • Eduardo Ekman Schenberg, “Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy: A Paradigm Shift in Psychiatric Research and Development,” Frontiers in Pharmacology 05 July 2018: https//doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2018.00733.
  • Ido Hartogsohn, “Set and Setting, Psychedelics and the Placebo Response: An Extra-Pharmacological Perspective on Psychopharmacology,” Journal of Psychopharmacology 30, no. 12 (2016): 1259-1267.
  • Ido Hartogsohn, “The Meaning-Enhancing Properties of Psychedelics and Their Mediator Role in Psychedelic Therapy, Spirituality, and Creativity,” Fronters in Neuroscience 12, no. 129 (2018): 1-5.
  • Matthew Oram, “Efficacy and Enlightenment: LSD Psychotherapy and the Drug Amendments of 1962,” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 69, no. 2 (2014): 221-250.
  • Alexander Lebedev, Martin Lovden, Gidon Rosenthal, Amanda Fielding, David J. Nutt, & Robin L. Carhart-Harris, “Finding the Self by Losing the Self: Neural Correlates of Ego‐Dissolution Under Psilocybin,” Human Brain Mapping 36 (2015): 3137-3153.

PHIL 6410 3.0M Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory

GS/PHIL 6410 3.0M Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory

  • Day & Time: Tuesday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Regina Rini
    E-mail: rarini@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 146

It is wrong to kick a puppy but fine to kick a stone. That’s because the puppy (and not the stone) has moral status, the property of possessing interests that ought to count in others’ moral choices—and the topic of this seminar. Where does moral status come from? Does it rely on some intrinsic property—perhaps consciousness, or the capacity to experience pain? Or is it an extrinsic property, something conferred by relationships among moral agents? We will pursue these questions both in abstract moral theory and in a series of concrete applications, asking about the (possible) moral status of non-human animals, plants, ecosystems, works of art, and future artificial intelligence.

PHIL 6500 3.0M Major Problems in Political Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6500 3.0M Major Problems in Political Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Wednesday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: L.P. Hodgson
    E-mail: lhodgson@glendon.yorku.ca
    Office: RS 444

The ideal of equality is central to progressive political thought, but it is remarkably elusive. In what respects exactly does justice demand that the members of a society be equal? Is equal political status sufficient? Is some form of material equality also required? Is it enough if opportunities are equal in some suitable sense? How should major historical sources of inequality such as race and gender feature in our thinking about these issues? And how should the various demands that equality makes be weighed against one another?

To tackle these questions, we will work through Niko Kolodny’s forthcoming book The Pecking Order, which provides one of the most detailed and careful treatments of egalitarian thought to date. We will also study some key texts on which Kolodny aims to build (including Elizabeth Anderson’s seminal presentation of relational egalitarianism) and others that he criticizes (including Arthur Ripstein’s influential reconstruction of Kant’s political philosophy).

PHIL 6550 Core Problems in Legal Philosophy

GS/PHIL 6550 Core Problems in Legal Philosophy

  • Day & Time: Mondays 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Michael Giudice
    E-mail: giudice@yorku.ca
    Office: TBA

One of the most significant challenges facing any political community is recognition of diversity among various groups along historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious dimensions. However, in Canada, as in other post-colonial states where there are indigenous populations, recognition may not be enough, and might even perpetuate colonialism in new forms. This seminar will explore the conceptual challenges that need to be faced to move from recognition to reconciliation in the Canadian context (though with some attention to other jurisdictions) and in particular whether such a move requires reconsideration of core concepts such as law, legal system, pluralism, sovereignty, and constitutionalism.

Fall/Winter 2021–22

PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

GS/PHIL 6850 6.0A PhD Research Seminar

  • Day & Time: Wednesday 2:30–5:30pm
    Room: TBA
  • Course Director: Professor Robert Myers
    E-mail: rmyers@yorku.ca
    Office: RS 431
  • Course Director: Professor Claudine Verheggen
    E-mail: cverheg@yorku.ca
    Office: S 4326

Course Description: Information to follow.

  • Auditing courses: students need to fill out the Course Transaction form, and bring it to the Graduate Program Assistant in the Graduate Program office in S429 Ross.

Not all courses listed below are offered every year.

Full Graduate Philosophy Course List

Philosophy 5040 3.0: Philosophical Paradoxes
Philosophy 5041 3.0: Contemporary Philosophy
Philosophy 5050 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 5126 3.0: Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 5150 3.0: Philosophy of Descartes
Philosophy 5200 3.0: Theoretical Ethics
Philosophy 5230 3.0: Origins & Development of Biology Theories
Philosophy 5235 3.0: Political Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5237 3.0: Moral Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5240 4.0: Topics in Argumentation
Philosophy 5250 3.0: Contemporary Issues in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 5260 3.0: Seminar in Gender and Transgender Theory
Philosophy 5270 3.0: Reasons and Desires
Philosophy 5310 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 5320 3.0: Philosophy of Language and Logic
Philosophy 5325 3.0: Investigating the Mind
Philosophy 5350 3.0: Topics in Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Philosophy of History
Philosophy 5440 3.0: Topics in the History of Philosophy: Rhetoric
Philosophy 5460 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 5500 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 5615 3.0: Introduction to Wittgenstein
Philosophy 5626 3.0: Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 5647 3.0: Topics in the Philosophy of Language: Truth
Philosophy 5670 3.0: Legal Philosophy between State and Transnationalism
Philosophy 5800 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5801 3.0: Core Theoretical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 5802 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 1
Philosophy 5803 3.0: Core Practical Philosophy 11
Philosophy 6010 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010 6.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6010A 3.0: Directed Readings
Philosophy 6100 3.0: Ancient Philosophy
Philosophy 6120 3.0: Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy 6130 3.0: Kant
Philosophy 6150 3.0: History of Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6155 3.0: Recent Trends in Continental Philosophy
Philosophy 6170 3.0: History of Analytic Philosophy
Philosophy 6180 3.0: Pragmatism
Philosophy 6185 3.0: Wittgenstein
Philosophy 6190 3.0: Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Philosophy 6230 3.0: Metaphysics
Philosophy 6235 3.0: Metaphysics of Science
Philosophy 6240 3.0: Epistemology
Philosophy 6245 3.0: New Directions in the Theory of Knowledge
Philosophy 6260 3.0: Philosophy of Science
Philosophy 6265 3.0: Philosophy of Physics
Philosophy 6275 3.0: Philosophy of Biology
Philosophy 6280 3.0: Philosophy of Social Science
Philosophy 6285 3.0: Philosophical Logic
Philosophy 6290 3.0: Philosophy of Logic
Philosophy 6295 3.0: Argumentation Theory
Philosophy 6300 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6305 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6315 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Philosophy of Language
Philosophy 6350 3.0: Major Figures in the Philosophy of Mind
Philosophy 6355 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of MInd
Philosophy 6360 3.0: Major Figures in Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6365 3.0: Major Problems in the Philosophy of Psychology
Philosophy 6370 3.0: Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Philosophy 6390 3.0: Philosophy of Action
Philosophy 6400 3.0: Major Figures in Moral Philosophy
Philosophy 6410 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Ethical Theory
Philosophy 6415 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Metaethics
Philosophy 6420 3.0: Topics in Moral Psychology
Philosophy 6470 3.0: Topics in Applied Ethics
Philosophy 6490 3.0: Theory and Practice in Bioethics
Philosophy 6500 3.0: Major Figures in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6505 3.0: Major Problems in Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6515 3.0: Issues in Contemporary Political Philosophy
Philosophy 6535 3.0: Recent Issues in Trans/Gender Theory
Philosophy 6540 3.0: Theories of International Justice and Rights
Philosophy 6550 3.0: Core Problems in Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6560 3.0: issues in Contemporary Legal Philosophy
Philosophy 6570 3.0: Philosophy of International Law
Philosophy 6800 6.0: First-Year Seminar
Philosophy 6850 6.0: PhD Research Seminar
Philosophy 6860 6.0: PhD Research Seminar II

CROSS LISTED COURSES  FROM OTHER  PROGRAMS:

Philosophy 6135 3.0: Hegel
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Though 6605 3.0

Philosophy 6145 3.0: Philosophy and its Others: Recent Reflections
x-listed with (Same as) Humanities 6323 3.0

Philosophy 6340 3.0: Advanced History and Theory of Psychology
x-listed with (Same as) Psychology 6060D 3.0

Philosophy 6440 3.0: Philosophy of History
x-listed with (Same as) Social & Political Thought 6127 3.0.